Mila Kunis That 70s Show

Unlike her co-stars, Mila Kunis was still technically a child when she appeared on That '70s Show — but she lied and said she was almost 18. During an interview on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno ... #TBT: Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher First Kissed on That '70s Show – See the Way They Were! this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines. Mila Kunis (born August 14, 1983) is an American actress. Milena Markovna Kunis was born in Chernivtsi, Ukrainian SSR in the Soviet Union. Her mother, Elvira, is a physics teacher who runs a pharmacy, and her father, Mark Kunis, is a mechanical engineer who works as a cab driver. Kunis has an elder brother named Michael. Her mother tongue and the common language within her family is Russian ... Mila Kunis has finally reunited with her That '70s Show castmates on the small screen.. Danny Masterson told ET in January that his “hope for the future” was to get the gang back together for ... Film and television actress Mila Kunis came to fame on the sitcom 'That '70s Show.' In film, she's co-starred in such hits as 'Forgetting Sarah Marshall, 'Black Swan' and 'Bad Moms.' Ashton Kutcher & Mila Kunis. Parents of infant daughter Wyatt, the ’70s Show’ co-stars (recently revealed to have gotten married in secret) didn’t get together until long after the sitcom ended. Since That '70s Show is how fans came to know and love the star, let's jump in a time machine and relive Kunis's best beauty moments as Jackie. Thanks to Netflix, all the nostalgia is only a few ... Ashton Kutcher (2015) Kunis married her former 'That '70s Show' co-star Ashton Kutcher in July 2015, months after she gave birth to their daughter, Wyatt. Here, they're seen promoting NBC's Red ... Mila Kunis denies it, but a singer named Kristina Karo accused her of stealing a chicken when they grew up together in Ukraine! Kristina came to LA and saw Mila Kunis thriving successfully on That ‘70s Show and decided to pursue a lawsuit. Mila Kunis responded as if the entire thing was just a joke. Mila Kunis, Actress: Black Swan. Mila Kunis was born Milena Markovna Kunis to a Jewish family in Chernivtsi, Ukraine, USSR (now independent Ukraine). Her mother, Elvira, is a physics teacher, her father, Mark Kunis, is a mechanical engineer, and she has an older brother named Michael. Her family moved to Los Angeles, California, in 1991. After attending one semester of college ...

Hello Wisconsin!

2011.07.29 13:08 banananinja Hello Wisconsin!

A subreddit for fans of That 70's Show.
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2010.10.25 00:15 neanderthalensis The original Mila Kunis subreddit

For fans of actress Mila Kunis. You can post whatever you like, as long as it is about Mila Kunis.
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2011.06.03 20:44 47hitman83 Mila Kunis

For fans of actress Mila Kunis.
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2020.09.18 17:41 HQCelebGifs Mila Kunis - That 70's Show - Season 4-6 (2002-2004)

Mila Kunis - That 70's Show - Season 4-6 (2002-2004) submitted by HQCelebGifs to Celebs [link] [comments]


2020.09.18 17:40 HQCelebGifs Mila Kunis - That 70's Show - Season 4-6 (2002-2004)

Mila Kunis - That 70's Show - Season 4-6 (2002-2004) submitted by HQCelebGifs to MilaKunis [link] [comments]


2020.09.01 20:59 thesndoubleop Finally watched Forgetting Sarah Marshall...

I’m sorry but I cannot understand how it gets as much praise as it does, especially on this sub. I’m a big fan of Jason Segel but this movie just felt aggressively mediocre from start to finish.
Since it wasn't all bad, I'll start with what I liked:
  1. Russell Brand. Saving grace of this movie for me. Had some really funny lines, great delivery, and overall just embodied the douchey, hedonic pop star really well.
  2. Some really solid side characters. Jonah Hill, Bill Hader, and Jack McBrayer all had funny moments and I liked a lot of the other hotel workers as well (bartender, luau guy, breakfast cocktail guy, etc.)
  3. Puppet rock opera scene. Fire.
What i didn't like:
  1. The plot was predictable. Oh the rock star rebound boyfriend is a slut? Sarah isnt gonna tour with him and have spindly legged fish net garbed babies? What the fuck! Who could have guessed? And woah! Sarah tries to get back with Peter, only for him to come clean and ruin his thing with Rachel? Shocker. As for the ending, I know we get to see Jason Segel naked but that doesn’t really take away from how predictable it is. It’s just trope plus penis and puppets. The whole thing is textbook romcom. As soon as Rachel is introduced the entire plot is laid out in front of you.
  2. I also had an issue with how heavy handed the symbolism was. Like the scene where Peter jumps in the water after Rachel, or when he’s arguing with Aldous and then gets mad and catches his first wave. That stuff was way too overt to feel powerful in terms of plot or character development. Have some subtlety.
  3. Mila Kunis. I really wanted to like her character. She was great in that 70s show but wow her performance in this was mediocre. Her dialogue with Jason felt corny and her character in general was unbelievably bland. I didn't think the whole “is she gonna go back to school” subplot was interesting. Also it’s not like there aren’t schools in Hawaii. If she wanted to pursue her education there she definitely could have. But instead she moves thousands of miles back to the mainland for a guy she knew for four days? Because he sent her a flyer for his rock opera? C’mon. Besides being hot this was overall a very forgettable performance for her.
  4. I'm sorry to say it, but Peter. Not a horrible character, and he had more personality than Rachel, but not one of Jason’s more likeable roles imo. Felt like a less interesting, more straight man/nice guy version of some of his other characters like Nick (freaks and geeks), Erik (undeclared), and Sydney (love you man).
  5. Unfortunately Paul Rudd's character was pretty average as well. It seems like he gets a lot of praise for this role but I didn't find him that funny (aside from the one “got any weed? Oh then let's go surfing” line). Don’t have a ton to say about him because it wasn’t a huge role but again, just a bit bland. And I’m usually a fan of his work.
Overall this was an exceptionally average movie with average characters, average acting, and an average plot. It had some redeemable qualities and made me laugh a few times but does not deserve anywhere close to the amount of praise it gets. I have preferred both Jason Segel and Mila Kunis in almost every other role I’ve seen them in. I’m probably gonna get hate for this but I really don’t understand why everyone is so attached to this movie. Am I missing something??
edit: did not double check about Apatow's involvement, he did not direct it.
submitted by thesndoubleop to movies [link] [comments]


2020.09.01 13:55 RELFantasticMaize2 My 18 year Generation Theory based on Cultural, Historical, and Technological Events

I decided to come back since this generation topic is just so interesting. Anyways, this is my generation theory. This will be my take on how I view each generation, based on 8 year pure cohorts and 10 year spectrums. Some of you may have seen a similar post like this in the past, as this is a repost, since I deleted the original post, with added notable people, and percentages of each generation. For those of you who have never seen the original post, in my opinion, I feel generations aren’t very clear cut and don’t evolve overnight. I don’t think people who are 15-17 years apart will share the exact same generation traits. I believe in 8 year solid cohorts, where the years that make up the quintessential part of the generation can be found. For Baby Boomers, it’s 1950-1957, for Gen X, its 1968-1975, for Millennials it’s 1986-1993, and for Gen Z, its 2004-2011. Everything else in between is a spectrum transitioning from one generation to the next. With these spectrums, every year, traits from the previous generation start to die off and new traits start to form, which would help lay the foundation for the next generation. With that out of the way, let’s begin:

Soomer Spectrum 1940-1949 Classes of 1958-1967
Last cohort to have any Silent traits, and the first to have any Boomer traits. They entered elementary school after World War II. They were all born after the introduction of the television. The first half were born during World War II and the last four years were born during the Baby Boom. They primarily spent most of their elementary school years and childhood during the post-war boom of the late 40s to mid 50s. The first half were born during World War II and the last four years were born during the Baby Boom. They are the 40s babies, were the pioneers of the Hippie Movement, and were the primary group drafted during the Vietnam War. They are the children of Greatests and Greatest Losts.
Famous people*: John Lennon, Bruce Lee, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Norris, Al Pacino, John Lewis, Bernie Sanders, Bob Dylan, Jesse Jackson, Kim Jong-Il, Muhammad Ali, Joe Biden, Stephen Hawking, Paul McCartney, Aretha Franklin, Robert De Niro, Mick Jagger, Danny DeVito, Jerry Springer, Herman Cain, Vince McMahon, Bob Marley, Donald Trump, Dolly Parton, Freddy Mercury, Sylvester Stallone, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Cher, David Bowie, Hilary Clinton, Arnold Schwarznegger, Elton John, Samuel L. Jackson, Prince Charles, Ozzy Osbourne, Meryl Streep, Billy Joel, Lionel Richie, Ric Flair, etc.\*

Pure Boomers 1950-1957 Classes of 1968-1975
Only cohort to have full Boomer traits. They entered elementary school after the Vietnam War began, primarily grew up during the rise of standard television, and entered high school after the Kennedy Assassination. The oldest year came of age in the year 1968, one of the most polarizing years in US history. The first half played a role in the Hippie Movement, as there was still a draft age, while the last couple of years came of age afterwards, but primarily spent most of their high school years and adolescence before the Disco era began. They are the children of Greatest Silents and Greatests.
Famous people: Dr. Phil, Bill Murray, Stevie Wonder, Robin Williams, Ben Carson, Phil Collins, Kurt Russell, Vladimir Putin, Patrick Swayze, David Hasselhoff, Hulk Hogan, Tim Allen, Cyndi Lauper, Oprah Winfrey, Jackie Chan, Denzel Washington, John Travolta, Roddy Piper, Walter Payton, Jerry Seinfeld, Howard Stern, Bill Gates, Kris Jenner, Steve Jobs, Bill Nye, Tom Hanks, Bryan Cranston, Bob Saget, Larry Bird, Mel Gibson, Caroline Kennedy, Bret Hart, Bernie Mac, Steve Harvey, etc.


Jones Spectrum 1958-1967 Classes of 1976-1985
Last cohort to have any Boomer traits, and the first to have any X traits. They entered elementary school after MLK’s I have a dream speach, which ended segregation, and were the first to grow up with Saturday morning cartoons, and during the rise of color television. They graduated high school after the release of the Apple I, but before the Challenger Disaster. The first half played a big role in the 1980 election. The first seven years were primary demographic during the Disco/Punk Era, as most of the cohort spent their adolescence during that time, with the last three years spending most of their adolescence during the MTV Era. They are the children of Greatest Silents and Silents.
Famous people*: Michael Jackson, Madonna, Ellen DeGeneres Simon Cowell, Magic Johnson, Weird Al Yankovic, Ultimate Warrior, Sting, Charlie Murphy, Dave Coulier, Mike Pence, RuPaul, Jane Lynch, Damon Wayans, Kathy Griffin, Tim Cook, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Sean Penn, John F. Kennedy Jr., Barack Obama, Princess Diana, Billy Ray Cyrus, George Clooney, Eddie Murphy, George Lopez, Ralph Macchio, Stephen Hillenburg, Michael J. Fox, Tom Cruise, Jim Carrey, Steve Carell, Steve Irwin, Michael Jordan, Johnny Depp, Brad Pitt, Whitney Houston, John Stamos, Lisa Kudrow, Kevin Chamberlain, Michelle Obama, Courteney Cox, Eazy E, Keanu Reaves, Stone Cold Steve Austin, Jeff Bezos, Robert Robert\ Downey, Jr., The Undertaker, J.K. Rowling, Dr. Dre, William Zabka, Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence, Charlie Sheen, Shawn Michaels, Ben Stiller, Scottie Pippen, Mike Tyson, Adam Sandler, Gordon Ramsay, David Schwimmer, Halle Berry, Janet Jackson, Rick Astley, Vin Diesel, Matt LeBlanc, Kurt Cobain, Will Farell, Julia Roberts, Jamie Foxx, Jimmy Kimmel, Mark Ruffalo, Eddie Guerrero, Chris Benoit, LaVar Ball, , etc.*


Pure X 1968-1975 Classes of 1986-1993 give or take late 1967 to mid 1975
Only cohort to have full X traits. They entered elementary school after Nixon’s second term election, which lead to his resignation. They were the first years to grow up with the first blockbusters such as Jaws, the first major gaming consoles such as the Atari 2600, and the first movie franchises such as Star Wars. They graduated high school after the Challenger Disaster, but before the launch of the World Wide Web, and primarily spent their adolescence before the USSR Collapse. They spent most of their high school years and adolescence in the MTV era and were the primary demographic. They are the children of Soomers and Silents.
Famous people: Will Smith, Hugh Jackman, Celine Dion, Tony Hawk, Kurt Angle, Terry Crews, Owen Wilson, LL Cool J, Tracy Morgan, Gary Coleman, Phil Lewis, Molly Ringwald, Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jay Z, Jennifer Aniston, Triple H, Paul Rudd, P Diddy, Matthew Perry, Mariah Carey, Melania Trump, Queen Latifah, Taraji P. Henson, Shane McMahon, Chris Jericho, Ted Cruz, DMX, Shawn Wayans, Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg, Elon Musk, Mark Walhberg, Winona Ryder, Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Notorious B.I.G., Eminem, Shaquille O'Neal, Sofia Vergara, Big Show, Ben Affleck, Marlon Wayans, Gabrielle Union, Paul Walker, Edge, Pharrell, Tyra Banks, Neil Patrick Harris, Seth McFarlane, Jim Parsons, Leonardo DiCaprio, Jimmy Fallon, Rey Mysterio Jr., Lil Kim, Derek Jeter, Nelly, Ryan Seacrest, Christian Bale, Boogie2988, Angelina Jolie, David Beckham, 50 Cent, Fergie, will.i.am, Drew Barrymore, Tiger Woods, Tobey Maguire, etc.


Xennial Spectrum 1976-1985 Classes of 1994-2003 give or take late 1975 to mid 1985
Last cohort to have any X traits, and the first to have any Millennial traits. They entered elementary school after Reagan was elected, which made our society more right leaning, they primarily grew up with gaming post-1983 with consoles such as the NES and SEGA Master System. The first half spent most of high school during the Grunge Era, and the second half during the Y2K era. They all graduated high school after the release of the World Wide Web, but spent at least most of it before 9/11. The first half of this cohort were hit by the Dot-Com Bubble, while the second half was hit by the Great Recession. They were the first years to serve in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars. They are the children of Soomers and Baby Boomers.
Famous People: Sia, DJ Khaled, Tiger Woods, Chadwick Boseman (RIP), Will Friedle, Fred Savage, Ryan Reynolds, Candace Cameron-Bure, Reese Witherspoon, Peyton Manning, Rick Ross, Chester Bennington, Blake Shelton, John Cena, Kanye West, Shakira, Tom Brady, Psy, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Brock Lesnar, Donald Trump Jr., AJ Styles, Jason Earles, Jerry Trainor, Jeff Hardy, Steve Aoki, John Green, Kobe Bryant, Ashton Kutcher, James Corden, Kenan Thompson, Usher, John Legend, James Franco, Rachel McAdams, Tia Mowry, Tamera Mowry, Zoe Saldana, CM Punk, Sheamus, Anthony Mackie, Manny Pacquiao, Kel Mitchell, Charlamagne Tha God, Tyrese Gibson, Kevin Hart, Adam Levine, Chris Pratt, Kourtney Kardashian, Pink, Aaliyah, Cooper Barnes, Heath Ledger, John Krasinski, Flo Rida, Rider Strong, Kim Kardashian, Channing Tatum, Ben Savage, Randy Orton, Macaulay Culkin, Gucci Mane, Ryan Gosling, TI, Christina Aguilera, Jake Gyllenhaal, Dolph Ziggler, The Miz, Swoozie, Beyonce, Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake, Chris Evans, Pitbull, Meghan Markle, Ivanka Trump, Danielle Fishel, Alicia Keys, Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, Dwyane Wade, Tati Westbrook, Jodie Sweetin, Keemstar, Anne Hathaway, Kelly Clarkson, Kate Middleton, Prince William, Roman Atwood, Chris Hemsworth, Nicki Bella, Carrie Underwood, Future, Mila Kunis, Scott Disick, Brie Bella,Khloe Kardashian, Eric Trump, Lebron James, Katy Perry, Scarlett Johansson, Avril Lavigne, Prince Harry, Ben Shapiro, Aubrey Plaza, T-Pain, Carmelo Anthony, Mark Zuckerberg, Lauren London, Christiano Ronaldo, Ashley Tisdale, Roman Reigns, Nipsey Hussle, J Cole, Lana Del Rey, Dean Ambrose, Anna Kendrick,etc.


Pure Millennials 1986-1993 Classes of 2004-2011 give or take late 1985 to mid 1993
Only cohort to have full Millennial traits. They all entered elementary school after the launch of the first Nickelodeon cartoons, which lead to the rise of cable kids programming, and grew up during the Disney Renaissance. They primarily spent their childhoods after the launch of the World Wide Web, and spent at least most of their adolescence and high school years in a post-9/11 world. They were the cohort hit the most by the Great Recession. They began high school after Y2K, and graduated after the release of MySpace and Facebook. They are the children of Baby Boomers and Generation Jones.
Famous people: Drake, Lady Gaga, Jenna Marbles, Raven-Symoné, Jeffree Star, Bruno Mars, Josh Peck, Drake Bell, Robert Pattinson, Ashley Olson, Mary-Kate Olson, Seth Rollins, Megan Fox, Lindsay Lohan, Lea Michele, Usain Bolt, Shia LaBeouf, Zac Efron, Lionel Messi, Blake Lively, Shay Mitchell, Michael B. Jordan, Naya Rivera, Anthony Padilla, Kendrick Lamar, Meek Mill, Kevin Jonas, Shane Dawson, Rihanna, Stephen Curry, Lilly Singh, Adele, Kevin Durant, Russel Westbrook, King Bach, Vanessa Hudgens, Blac Chyna, Lizzo, Pewdiepie, Taylor Swift, Chris Brown, Nina Dobrev, Daniel Radcliffe, Jason Derulo, Markiplier, Joe Jonas, Elizabeth Olson, James Harden, Carlos PenaVega, Logan Henderson, Corbin Bleu, Jennifer Lawrence, The Weeknd, Ryan Higa, Iggy Azalea, Machine Gun Kelly, Margot Robbie, Cash Nasty, Soulja Boy, Catherine Paiz, Sarah Hyland, Klay Thompson, James Maslow, Kendall Schmidt, Ninja, Ed Sheeran, Charlie Puth, Joey Graceffa, Amanda Cerny, Gabbie Hanna, Azzyland, Tyler the Creator, Fetty Wap, DaBaby, Quavo, Tyler Posey, Shailene Woodley, Jamie Lynn Spears, Emma Roberts, Selena Gomez, Cardi B, Cole Sprouse, Miley Cyrus, Austin McBroom, SSSniperWolf, Demi Lovato, Nick Jonas, Travis Scott, Dylan Sprouse, Mac Miller, Taylor Lautner, Ariana Grande, KSI, Zayn Malik, Niall Horan, Debby Ryan, Victoria Justice, Sofia Carson, Miranda Cosgrove, Lucas Cruikshank, etc.


Zillennial Spectrum 1994-2003 Classes of 2012-2021 give or take late 1993 to mid 2003
Last cohort to have any Millennial traits, and the first to have any Z traits. They entered elementary school after Columbine, which lead to kids becoming more sheltered. They primarily spent their childhoods in a post-9/11 world, witnessing our world becoming more mobilized. The first half were able to vote in the 2016 elections. They all spent most of their teens in the 2010s, which was half Millennial and half Gen Z culturally. They all graduated high school after smartphones surpassed flip phones in sales, but spent at least most of it before COVID-19. They are the cohort being hit the most by the COVID-19 Recession. They are the children of Generation Jones and Generation X.
Famous people*: Justin Bieber, Harry Styles, Lil Uzi Vert, Camila Mendes, Meghan Trainor, Halsey, Caspar Lee, Madelaine Petsch, Lil Baby, Logan Paul, Kendall Jenner, Ross Lynch, Timothée Chalamet, Post Malone, Gigi Hadid, Queen Naija, Dua Lipa, Megan Thee Stallion, David Dobrik, Tom Holland, RiceGum, Lele Pons, Zendaya, Liza Koshy, Dove Cameron, Alissa Violet, 6IX9INE, Lili Reinhart, Noah Centineo, Kylie Jenner, Jake Paul, Lonzo Ball, Camila Cabello, Nash Grier, Bella Thorne, KJ Apa, Becky G, Jacob Elordi, DDG, Infinite, Kodak Black, Lil Yachty, Olivia Holt, Kira Kosarin, Simone Biles, Blueface, Shawn Mendez, XXXTentacion, Brent Rivera, Tana Mongeau, Juice WRLD, Peyton List, Mr Beast, Jaden Smith, Tfue, Liangelo Ball, China Anne McClain, Peyton Meyer, Bradley Steven Perry, Khalid, James Charles, Madison Beer, Karan Brar, Grayson Dolan, Ethan Dolan, Sabrina Carpenter, Cameron Boyce, NBA Youngboy, Lil Nas X, Joey King, Addison Rae, Baby Ariel, Lil Pump, Jace Norman, Woah Vicky, Joshua Bassett, Kiera Bridget, Noah Cyrus, Willow Smith, Haley Pham, Meg Donnelly, Griffin Gluck, Dixie D'Amelio, Billie Eilish, Noah Beck, Emma Chamberlain, Morgz, Chloe Lukasiak, Nia Sioux, Rowan Blanchard, Isabela Merced, Hannah Meloche, Caleb McLaughlin, Lamelo Ball, Jacob Sartorious, Chase Hudson, Loren Gray, Maddie Ziegler, Asher Angel, Finn Wolfhard, Gaten Matarazzo, Skai Jackson, Jenna Ortega, Malu Travejo, NLE CHOPPA, Lil Tecca, Cash Baker, Matty B, Johnny Orlando, Sophia Grace Brownlee, Lizzy Greene, BhadBhabie, Olivia Rodrigo,etc.\*


Pure Z 2004-2011 Classes of 2022-2029 give or take late 2003 to mid 2011
Only cohort to have full Z traits. They all entered elementary school after Obama was elected, which made our society more left leaning, and after the Great Recession ended, but before Trump was elected. They spent at least most of their childhood and elementary school years after smartphones surpassed flip phones in sales, but before COVID-19, and they will be spending at least most of their high school years and adolescence in the COVID-19 and post-COVID-19 world of the 2020s, and will all likely graduate high school after the COVID-19 pandemic ends. They are the children of Generation X and Xennials.
Famous people: Aidan Gallagher, Charli D'Amelio, Annie LeBlanc, Mackenzie Ziegler, Millie Bobby Brown, Noah Schnapp, Lauren Orlando, Grace VanderWaal, Ellie Zeiler, Lebron James Jr., Sky Katz, Casey Simpson, Francesca Capaldi, Sofia Wylie, Addison Riecke, Mace Coronel, EvanTubeHD, Honey Boo Boo, Ella Anderson, Isaac Ryan Brown, Gianna Bryant, Rosie McClelland, Ruby Rube, Barron Trump, McKenna Grace, Ava Kolker, Adelia Rose, Mason Ramsey, Trinitee Stokes, Ariana Greenblatt, August Maturo, Elias Harger, Malachi Barton, Jason Maybaum, Hayley LeBlanc, Mia Talerico, JillianTubeHD, Gavin Thomas, Christiano Ronaldo Jr., etc,


Zalpha Spectrum 2012-2021 Classes of 2030-2039 give or take late 2011 to mid 2021
Last cohort to have any Z traits and the first to have Alpha traits. They entered elementary school after Trump was elected and will primarily spend their childhoods in a post-COVID-19 world. They will graduate high school in the 2030s. They are the children of Xennials and Millennials.
Famous people*: Ryan’s Toy Reviews, Riley Curry, Blue Ivy Carter, North West, etc.\*
There is also a 18 year patterns between Soomers, Jones, Xennials, and Zillennials. These spectrums first come of age during a tech boom, then an election, then a crisis, then a culture shift, then a major historic crisis.


The first three years tend to come of age after, or spend most of their adolescence after a technology boom.
1940: graduated high school after the first digital phone line is developed.
1958: graduated high school after the release of the Apple I.
1976: graduated high school after the launch of the World Wide Web.
1994: graduated high school after smartphones surpassed feature phones in sales.

1941: graduated high school after the first automatic camera is released.
1959: graduated high school after the release of the PET.
1977: graduated high school the year Windows 95 was released.
1995: graduated high school the year tablets surpassed PCs in sales.

1942: graduated high school after the first laser is built.
1960: graduated high school after the world‘s first cellular network.
1978: graduated high school after the release of the Motorola StarTac.
1996: graduated high school after the release of the Samsung Gear.

The fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh years tend to come of age before an election, during a major crisis, or before the next generation’s culture is in full swing.
1943: graduated high school after Kennedy was elected.
1961: graduated high school before the Iran Hostage Crisis.
1979: graduated high school before Clinton’s Impeachment.
1997: graduated high school after the rise of ISIS and before gay marriage was federally legalized.

1944: graduated high school before the Cuban Missile Crisis.
1962: graduated high school before Reagan was elected.
1980: graduated high school before the debut of TRL and Columbine.
1998: graduated high school before Trump was elected.

1945: graduated high school before MLK’s I Have a Dream Speech and the Kennedy Assassination.
1963: graduated high school before the debut of MTV.
1981: graduated high school before Y2K.
1999: graduated high school before the US-China Trade War began and Parkland.

1946: graduated high school after the Beetles arrived in America.
1964: graduated high school after AIDS started.
1982: graduated high school before Bush was elected.
2000: graduated high school before the release of TikTok.

The last three years tend to either spend most of their adolescence after a new president is elected, during another election, before a crisis, or come of age before or after a major crisis.
1947: graduated high school after the first American combat troops arrive in Vietnam.
1965: spent most of high school after Reagan was elected.
1983: graduated high school before 9/11.
2001: spent most of high school after Trump was elected, and graduated before COVID-19.

1948: spent most of high school after the Kennedy Assassination.
1966: graduated high school after the NCI announced they found the cause of AIDS.
1984: graduated high school after 9/11 happened.
2002: graduated high school after COVID-19 started, and after Trump’s impeachment.

1949: graduated high school before the MLK Assassination.
1967: graduated high school before the Challenger Disaster, but after the 1984 election.
1985: spent most of high school after Bush was elected, but before 9/11, graduated after the Iraq Invasion.
2003: spent most of high school before COVID-19, will graduate after the upcoming 2020 election, and could possibly be the last to graduate before the pandemic ends.

How Baby Boomer, Gen X, Millennial, and Gen Z each year is:
Late Silents 1940 (Class of 1958): 10% BB, 90% S 1941 (Class of 1959): 20% BB, 80% S 1942 (Class of 1960): 30% BB, 70% S
Prime Soomers 1943 (Class of 1961): 40% BB, 60% S 1944 (Class of 1962): 45% BB, 55% S 1945 (Class of 1963): 55% BB, 45% S 1946 (Class of 1964): 60% BB, 40% S
Early Boomers 1947 (Class of 1965): 70% BB, 30% S 1948 (Class of 1966): 80% BB, 20% S 1949 (Class of 1967): 90% BB, 10% S
Core Boomers 1950 (Class of 1968): 100% BB 1951 (Class of 1969): 100% BB 1952 (Class of 1970): 100% BB 1953 (Class of 1971): 100% BB 1954 (Class of 1972): 100% BB 1955 (Class of 1973): 100% BB 1956 (Class of 1974): 100% BB 1957 (Class of 1975): 100% BB
Late Boomers 1958 (Class of 1976): 10% X, 90% BB 1959 (Class of 1977): 20% X, 80% BB 1960 (Class of 1978): 30% X, 70% BB
Prime Jones 1961 (Class of 1979): 40% X, 60% BB 1962 (Class of 1980): 45% X, 55% BB 1963 (Class of 1981): 55% X, 45% BB 1964 (Class of 1982): 60% X, 40% BB
Early X 1965 (Class of 1983): 70% X, 30% BB 1966 (Class of 1984): 80% X, 20% BB 1967 (Class of 1985): 90% X, 10% BB
Core X 1968 (Class of 1986/give or take late 1967-mid 1968): 100% X 1969 (Class of 1987/give or take late 1968-mid 1969): 100% X 1970 (Class of 1988/give or take late 1969-mid 1970): 100% X 1971 (Class of 1989/give or take late 1970-mid 1971): 100% X 1972 (Class of 1990/give or take late 1971-mid 1972): 100% X 1973 (Class of 1991/give or take late 1972-mid 1973): 100% X 1974 (Class of 1992/give or take late 1973-mid 1974): 100% X 1975 (Class of 1993/give or take late 1974-mid 1975): 100% X
Late X 1976 (Class of 1994/give or take late 1975-mid 1976): 10% Y, 90% X 1977 (Class of 1995/give or take late 1976-mid 1977): 20% Y, 80% X 1978 (Class of 1996/give or take late 1977-mid 1978): 30% Y, 70% X
Prime Xennials 1979 (Class of 1997/give or take late 1978-mid 1979): 40% Y, 60% X 1980 (Class of 1998/give or take late 1979-mid 1980): 45% Y, 55% X 1981 (Class of 1999/give or take late 1980-mid 1981): 55% Y, 45% X 1982 (Class of 2000/give or take late 1981-mid 1982): 60% Y, 40% X
Early Millennials 1983 (Class of 2001/give or take late 1982-mid 1983): 70% Y, 30% X 1984 (Class of 2002/give or take late 1983-mid 1984): 80% Y, 20% X 1985 (Class of 2003/give or take late 1984-mid 1985): 90% Y, 10% X
Core Millennials 1986 (Class of 2004/give or take late 1985-mid 1986): 100% Y 1987 (Class of 2005/give or take late 1986-mid 1987): 100% Y 1988 (Class of 2006/give or take late 1987-mid 1988): 100% Y 1989 (Class of 2007/give or take late 1988-mid 1989): 100% Y 1990 (Class of 2008/give or take late 1989-mid 1990): 100% Y 1991 (Class of 2009/give or take late 1990-mid 1991): 100% Y 1992 (Class of 2010/give or take late 1991-mid 1992): 100% Y 1993 (Class of 2011/give or take late 1992-mid 1993): 100% Y
Late Millennials 1994 (Class of 2012/give or take late 1993-mid 1994): 10% Z, 90% Y 1995 (Class of 2013/give or take late 1994-mid 1995): 20% Z, 80% Y 1996 (Class of 2014/give or take late 1995-mid 1996): 30% Z, 70% Y
Prime Zillennials 1997 (Class of 2015/give or take late 1996-mid 1997): 40% Z, 60% Y 1998 (Class of 2016/give or take late 1997-mid 1998): 45% Z, 55% Y 1999 (Class of 2017/give or take late 1998-mid 1999): 55% Z, 45% Y 2000 (Class of 2018/give or take late 1999-mid 2000): 60% Z, 40% Y
Early Z 2001 (Class of 2019/ give or take late 2000-mid 2001): 70% Z, 30% Y 2002 (Class of 2020/give or take late 2001-mid 2002): 80% Z, 20% Y 2003 (Class of 2021/give or take late 2002-mid 2003): 90% Z, 10% Y
Core Z 2004 (Class of 2022/give or take late 2003-mid 2004): 100% Z 2005 (Class of 2023/give or take late 2004-mid 2005): 100% Z 2006 (Class of 2024/give or take late 2005-mid 2006): 100% Z 2007 (Class of 2025/give or take late 2006-mid 2007): 100% Z 2008 (Class of 2026/give or take late 2007-mid 2008): 100% Z 2009 (Class of 2027/give or take late 2008-mid 2009): 100% Z 2010 (Class of 2028/give or take late 2009-mid 2010): 100% Z 2011 (Class of 2029/give or take late 2010-mid 2011): 100% Z
Late Z 2012 (Class of 2030/give or take late 2011-mid 2012): 90% Z, 10% A 2013 (Class of 2031/give or take late 2012-mid 2013): 80% Z, 20% A 2014 (Class of 2032/give or take late 2013-mid 2014): 70% Z, 30% A
Prime Zalphas 2015 (Class of 2033/give or take late 2014-mid 2015): 60% Z, 40% A 2016 (Class of 2034/give or take late 2015-mid 2016): 55% Z, 45% A 2017 (Class of 2035/give or take late 2016-mid 2017): 45% Z, 55% A 2018 (Class of 2036/give or take late 2017-mid 2018): 40% Z, 60% A
Early Alpha 2019 (Class of 2037/give or take late 2018-mid 2019): 30% Z, 70% A 2020 (Class of 2038/give or take late 2019-mid 2020): 20% Z, 80% A 2021 (Class of 2039/give or take late 2020-mid 2021): 10% Z, 90% A

And finally, here’s how this theory would work well with the early, core, and late model:
Soomer Spectrum 1940-1949 (Classes of 1958-1967)
Baby Boomers: 1945-1962 (Classes of 1963-1980)
Early Boomers: 1945-1949 (Classes of 1963-1967)
Core Boomers: 1950-1957 (Classes of 1968-1975)
Late Boomers: 1958-1962 (Classes of 1976-1980)
Jones Spectrum: 1958-1967 (Classes of 1976-1985 give or take to mid 1967)
Generation X: 1963-1980 (Classes of 1981-1998 give or take to mid 1980)
Early X: 1963-1967 (Classes of 1981-1985 give or take to mid 1967)
Core X: 1968-1975 (Classes of 1986-1993 give or take late 1967-mid 1975)
Late X: 1976-1980 (Classes of 1994-1998 give or take late 1975-mid 1980)
Xennial Spectrum: 1976-1985 (Classes of 1994-2003 give or take late 1975-mid 1985)
Millennials: 1981-1998 (Classes of 1999-2016 give or take late 1980-mid 1998)
Early Millennials: 1981-1985 (Classes of 1999-2003 give or take late 1980-mid 1985)
Core Millennials: 1986-1993 (Classes of 2004-2011 give or take late 1985-mid 1993)
Late Millennials: 1994-1998 (Classes of 2012-2016 give or take late 1993-mid 1998)
Zillennial Spectrum: 1994-2003 (Classes of 2012-2021 give or take late 1993-mid 2003)
Generation Z: 1999-2016 (Classes of 2017-2034 give or take late 98-mid 16)
Early Z: 1999-2003 (Classes of 2017-2021 give or take late 1998-mid 2003)
Core Z: 2004-2011 (Classes of 2022-2029 give or take late 2003-mid 2011)
Late Z: 2012-2016 (Classes of 2030-2034 give or take late 2011-mid 2016)
Zalpha Spectrum: 2012-2021 (Classes of 2030-2039 give or take late 2011-mid 2021)
submitted by RELFantasticMaize2 to generationology [link] [comments]


2020.09.01 09:04 youngbull316 If all generations were 18-19 years

Probably goes like this, based on how S&H and others grouped the generations:

Lost: 1890-1908 (parents to members of GI's and Silents; children to Progressives and Missionaries)
Older Lost: 1890-1895 (100% Lost, the "true" group, even though they are the older group numerically, based on S&H are grouped in the middle)
Famous people: Dwight D. Eisenhower, Colonel Sanders, Babe Ruth, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, etc.
Middle Lost: 1896-1902 (the numerical "core" of the Losts, but might have the first signs of any GI traits)
Famous people: Paul Robeson, Amelia Earhart, Walt Disney, Louis Armstrong, Charles Lindberg, Emma Morano, Duke Ellington, Al Capone, etc.
Younger Lost: 1903-1908 (still mostly Lost but have significant GI traits, to the point where at times might be the majority)
Famous people: Lyndon B. Johnson, Dr. Seuss, Lou Gehrig, etc.

GI's: 1909-1927 (parents to members of Silents and Baby Boomers, rarely Generation X; children to Missionaries and Losts)
Older GI's: 1909-1914 (barely have any Lost traits remaining, almost fully GI)
Famous people: Ronald Reagan, Richard Nixon, Rosa Parks, Jesse Owens, Gerald Ford, Joe DiMaggio, etc.
Middle GI's: 1915-1921 (probably 100% GI and the absolute representation of the generation, still too early for any sign of Silent traits)
Famous people: John F. Kennedy, Frank Sinatra, David Rockefeller, Roald Dahl, Ella Fitzgerald, Jackie Robinson, etc.
Younger GI's: 1922-1927 (still very GI but have significant Silent traits)
Famous people: Betty White, Stan Lee, Red Foxx, Charles Schulz, Mae Young, George H.W. Bush, Jimmy Carter, Malcolm X, Dick Van Dyke, Barbara Bush, Marilyn Monroe, Hugh Hefner, Queen Elizabeth II, Andy Griffith, Jerry Stiller, William Daniels, etc.

Silents: 1928-1945 (parents to members of Baby Boomers and Generation X, rarely Millennials; children to Losts and GI's)
Older Silents: 1928-1933 (older Silents, barely have GI traits, almost fully Silent)
Famous people: Shirley Temple, Maya Angelou, Martin Luther King, Jr., Fred Rogers, Adam West, Joe Jackson, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Anne Frank, Clint Eastwood, Neil Armstrong, Regis Philbin, Johnny Cash, Gene Wilder, Joan Rivers, etc.
Middle Silents: 1934-1939 (Basically 100% Silents, but the younger group possibly have very slight Boomer traits)
Famous people: Bill Russel, Elvis Presley, Dalai Lama, Wilt Chamberlain, Bruno Sammartino, Bill Cosby, Jane Fonda, Jerry West, Pope Francis, John McCain, Morgan Freeman, George Carlin, Kenny Rogers, Ben E. King, Oscar Robertson, Marvin Gaye, John McArthur, Lee Harvey Oswald, etc.
Younger Silents: 1940-1945 (Still Silents, especilally due to being born during the war, not after it, but have strong Boomer traits)
Famous people: John Lennon, Bruce Lee, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Norris, Al Pacino, John Lewis, Bernie Sanders, Bob Dylan, Jesse Jackson, Kim Jong-Il, Muhammad Ali, Joe Biden, Stephen Hawking, Paul McCartney, Aretha Franklin, Robert De Niro, Mick Jagger, Danny DeVito, Jerry Springer, Herman Cain, Vince McMahon, Bob Marley, etc.

Baby Boomers: 1946-1964 (parents to members of Generation X and Millennials, rarely Generation Z/Homelanders; children to GI's and Silents)
Older Baby Boomers: 1946-1951 (the proverbial "core" of Boomers and what most people think of when you're talking about "Baby Boomers" but nonetheless still have some Silent traits)
Famous people: Donald Trump, Dolly Parton, Freddy Mercury, Sylvester Stallone, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Cher, David Bowie, Hilary Clinton, Arnold Schwarznegger, Elton John, Samuel L. Jackson, Prince Charles, Ozzy Osbourne, Meryl Streep, Billy Joel, Lionel Richie, Ric Flair, Dr. Phil, Bill Murray, Stevie Wonder, Robin Williams, Ben Carson, Phil Collins, Kurt Russell, etc.
Middle Baby Boomers: 1952-1958 (the actual "core" of Boomers, in-between zone for Post-War Boomers born in the late 40's-early 50's and Generation Jones born in the late 50's-early 60's, 100% Baby Boomer)
Famous people: Vladimir Putin, Patrick Swayze, David Hasselhoff, Hulk Hogan, Tim Allen, Cyndi Lauper, Oprah Winfrey, Jackie Chan, Denzel Washington, John Travolta, Roddy Piper, Walter Payton, Jerry Seinfeld, Howard Stern, Bill Gates, Kris Jenner, Steve Jobs, Bill Nye, Tom Hanks, Bryan Cranston, Bob Saget, Larry Bird, Mel Gibson, Caroline Kennedy, Bret Hart, Bernie Mac, Steve Harvey, Michael Jackson, Ellen DeGeneres, Alec Baldwin, Ice T, Madonna, Prince, Keenan Ivory Wayans, etc.
Younger Baby Boomers: 1959-1964 (the "Generation Jones" group, not as quintessential as the older Boomer group is but they are still very Boomer, though have some X traits)
Famous people: Simon Cowell, Magic Johnson, Weird Al Yankovic, Ultimate Warrior, Sting, Charlie Murphy, Dave Coulier, Mike Pence, RuPaul, Jane Lynch, Damon Wayans, Kathy Griffin, Tim Cook, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Sean Penn, John F. Kennedy Jr., Barack Obama, Princess Diana, Billy Ray Cyrus, George Clooney, Eddie Murphy, George Lopez, Ralph Macchio, Stephen Hillenburg, Michael J. Fox, Tom Cruise, Jim Carrey, Steve Carell, Steve Irwin, Michael Jordan, Johnny Depp, Brad Pitt, Whitney Houston, John Stamos, Lisa Kudrow, Kevin Chamberlain, Michelle Obama, Courteney Cox, Eazy E, Keanu Reaves, Stone Cold Steve Austin, Jeff Bezos, etc.

Generation X: 1965-1983 (parents to members of Millennials and Generation Z/Homelanders, and rarely the post-Homeland generation; children to Silents and Baby Boomers)
Older Xers: 1965-1971 (the "Brat Pack" cohort that grew up in the 70's and came of age in the 80's and were the main target audience for many Gen X coming of age films during the 80's, were in the past considered to be the peak of Gen X, but now are the older group, still strongly X but might have some remaining BoomeJones traits)
Famous people: Robert Downey, Jr., The Undertaker, J.K. Rowling, Dr. Dre, William Zabka, Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence, Charlie Sheen, Shawn Michaels, Ben Stiller, Scottie Pippen, Mike Tyson, Adam Sandler, Gordon Ramsay, David Schwimmer, Halle Berry, Janet Jackson, Rick Astley, Vin Diesel, Matt LeBlanc, Kurt Cobain, Will Farell, Julia Roberts, Jamie Foxx, Jimmy Kimmel, Mark Ruffalo, Eddie Guerrero, Chris Benoit, LaVar Ball, Will Smith, Hugh Jackman, Celine Dion, Tony Hawk, Kurt Angle, Terry Crews, Owen Wilson, LL Cool J, Tracy Morgan, Gary Coleman, Phil Lewis, Molly Ringwald, Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jay Z, Jennifer Aniston, Triple H, Paul Rudd, P Diddy, Matthew Perry, Mariah Carey, Melania Trump, Queen Latifah, Taraji P. Henson, Shane McMahon, Chris Jericho, Ted Cruz, DMX, Shawn Wayans, Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg, Elon Musk, Mark Walhberg, Winona Ryder, etc.
Middle Xers: 1972-1977 (Basically 100% X, Boomer influence is long gone and Millennial influence is not really around this group much, the actual "zeitgeist" of Gen X, grew up in the 80's and came of age in the 90's, around the time Grunge (the quintessential Gen X music genre) was most popular and before the internet broke out to new lengths with Windows 95, revolutionizing how we interact with each other)
Famous people: Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Notorious B.I.G., Eminem, Shaquille O'Neal, Sofia Vergara, Big Show, Ben Affleck, Marlon Wayans, Gabrielle Union, Paul Walker, Edge, Pharrell, Tyra Banks, Neil Patrick Harris, Seth McFarlane, Jim Parsons, Leonardo DiCaprio, Jimmy Fallon, Rey Mysterio Jr., Lil Kim, Derek Jeter, Nelly, Ryan Seacrest, Christian Bale, Boogie2988, Sia, DJ Khaled, Angelina Jolie, David Beckham, 50 Cent, Fergie, will.i.am, Drew Barrymore, Tiger Woods, Tobey Maguire, Chadwick Boseman (RIP), Will Friedle, Fred Savage, Ryan Reynolds, Candace Cameron-Bure, Reese Witherspoon, Peyton Manning, Rick Ross, Chester Bennington, Blake Shelton, John Cena, Kanye West, Shakira, Tom Brady, Psy, Floyd Mayweather Jr., Brock Lesnar, Donald Trump Jr., AJ Styles, Jason Earles, Jerry Trainor, Jeff Hardy, Steve Aoki, John Green, etc.
Younger Xers: 1978-1983 (the caboose of Gen X, in-between X and Millennial with strong Millennial traits but overall still leaning toward the X side, came of age after Windows 95 during the late 90s-early 00s, when pop culture was still X-oriented but quickly shifting in favor of Millennials, but before 9/11, in which changed the atmosphere of not only America but the whole world (even though it was a US event)
Famous people: Kobe Bryant, Ashton Kutcher, James Corden, Kenan Thompson, Usher, John Legend, James Franco, Rachel McAdams, Tia Mowry, Tamera Mowry, Zoe Saldana, CM Punk, Sheamus, Anthony Mackie, Manny Pacquiao, Kel Mitchell, Charlamagne Tha God, Tyrese Gibson, Kevin Hart, Adam Levine, Chris Pratt, Kourtney Kardashian, Pink, Aaliyah, Cooper Barnes, Heath Ledger, John Krasinski, Flo Rida, Rider Strong, Kim Kardashian, Channing Tatum, Ben Savage, Randy Orton, Macaulay Culkin, Gucci Mane, Ryan Gosling, TI, Christina Aguilera, Jake Gyllenhaal, Dolph Ziggler, The Miz, Swoozie, Beyonce, Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake, Chris Evans, Pitbull, Meghan Markle, Ivanka Trump, Danielle Fishel, Alicia Keys, Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, Dwyane Wade, Tati Westbrook, Jodie Sweetin, Keemstar, Anne Hathaway, Kelly Clarkson, Kate Middleton, Prince William, Roman Atwood, Chris Hemsworth, Nicki Bella, Carrie Underwood, Future, Mila Kunis, Scott Disick, Brie Bella, etc.

Millennials: 1984-2002 (parents to members of Generation Z/Homelanders and the post-Homeland Generation; children to the Baby Boomers and Generation X)
Older Millennials: 1984-1990 (the rise of Millennials, came of age right after 9/11, sometime in the 2000's, got to vote for either Bush, Obama, or both, and are probably the most liberal cohort of Millennials, compared to the middle and younger Millennials that possibly have a mix of liberals and conservatives, they have strong Millennial traits so while some of them have X traits, it is kinda weak compared to the Millennial traits that they have)
Famous people: Khloe Kardashian, Eric Trump, Lebron James, Katy Perry, Scarlett Johansson, Avril Lavigne, Prince Harry, Ben Shapiro, Aubrey Plaza, T-Pain, Carmelo Anthony, Mark Zuckerberg, Lauren London, Christiano Ronaldo, Jeffree Star, Bruno Mars, Ashley Tisdale, Roman Reigns, Raven-Symoné, Nipsey Hussle, J Cole, Lana Del Rey, Dean Ambrose, Anna Kendrick, Drake, Lady Gaga, Jenna Marbles, Josh Peck, Drake Bell, Robert Pattinson, Ashley Olson, Mary-Kate Olson, Seth Rollins, Megan Fox, Lindsay Lohan, Lea Michele, Usain Bolt, Shia LaBeouf, Zac Efron, Lionel Messi, Blake Lively, Shay Mitchell, Michael B. Jordan, Naya Rivera, Anthony Padilla, Kendrick Lamar, Meek Mill, Kevin Jonas, Shane Dawson, Rihanna, Stephen Curry, Lilly Singh, Adele, Kevin Durant, Russel Westbrook, King Bach, Vanessa Hudgens, Blac Chyna, Lizzo, Pewdiepie, Taylor Swift, Chris Brown, Nina Dobrev, Daniel Radcliffe, Jason Derulo, Markiplier, Joe Jonas, Elizabeth Olson, James Harden, Carlos PenaVega, Logan Henderson, Corbin Bleu, Jennifer Lawrence, The Weeknd, Ryan Higa, Iggy Azalea, Machine Gun Kelly, Margot Robbie, Cash Nasty, Soulja Boy, Catherine Paiz, Sarah Hyland, Klay Thompson, James Maslow, Kendall Schmidt, etc.
Middle Millennials: 1991-1996 (the zeitgeist of Millennials, basically 100% Millennial, even if there are any sort of Z traits, it's not strong within this group, came of age after the Great Recession and 2008 election but prior to Gamergate, ISIS, etc. First election was either during the Obama or Trump elections)
Famous people: Ninja, Ed Sheeran, Charlie Puth, Joey Graceffa, Amanda Cerny, Gabbie Hanna, Azzyland, Tyler the Creator, Fetty Wap, DaBaby, Quavo, Tyler Posey, Shailene Woodley, Jamie Lynn Spears, Emma Roberts, Selena Gomez, Cardi B, Cole Sprouse, Miley Cyrus, Austin McBroom, SSSniperWolf, Demi Lovato, Nick Jonas, Travis Scott, Dylan Sprouse, Mac Miller, Taylor Lautner, Ariana Grande, KSI, Zayn Malik, Niall Horan, Debby Ryan, Meghan Trainor, Victoria Justice, Sofia Carson, Miranda Cosgrove, Lucas Cruikshank, Justin Bieber, Harry Styles, Lil Uzi Vert, Camila Mendes, Halsey, Caspar Lee, Madelaine Petsch, Lil Baby, Logan Paul, Kendall Jenner, Ross Lynch, Timothée Chalamet, Post Malone, Gigi Hadid, Queen Naija, Dua Lipa, Megan Thee Stallion, David Dobrik, Tom Holland, RiceGum, Lele Pons, Zendaya, Liza Koshy, Dove Cameron, Alissa Violet, 6IX9INE, Lili Reinhart, Noah Centineo, etc.
Younger Millennials: 1997-2002 (the caboose of Millennials, in-between Millennial and Gen Z/Homelander, having strong Gen Z traits, but still overall leaning toward the Millennial side of things, came of age before and during Covid-19, born around the new millenium and 9/11, during the Clinton and Bush administrations, first elections will all be while Trump is running for president, were kids and preteens during the recession and adolescents during the Obama administration, and born before the establishment of Homeland security, which is one of the reasons why they are all Millenials)
Famous people: Kylie Jenner, Jake Paul, Lonzo Ball, Camila Cabello, Nash Grier, Bella Thorne, KJ Apa, Becky G, Jacob Elordi, DDG, Infinite, Kodak Black, Lil Yachty, Olivia Holt, Kira Kosarin, Simone Biles, Blueface, Shawn Mendez, XXXTentacion, Brent Rivera, Tana Mongeau, Juice WRLD, Peyton List, Mr Beast, Jaden Smith, Tfue, Liangelo Ball, China Anne McClain, Peyton Meyer, Bradley Steven Perry, Khalid, James Charles, Madison Beer, Karan Brar, Grayson Dolan, Ethan Dolan, Sabrina Carpenter, Cameron Boyce, NBA Youngboy, Lil Nas X, Joey King, Addison Rae, Baby Ariel, Lil Pump, Jace Norman, Woah Vicky, Joshua Bassett, Kiera Bridget, Noah Cyrus, Willow Smith, Haley Pham, Meg Donnelly, Griffin Gluck, Dixie D'Amelio, Billie Eilish, Noah Beck, Emma Chamberlain, Morgz, Chloe Lukasiak, Nia Sioux, Rowan Blanchard, Isabela Merced, Hannah Meloche, Caleb McLaughlin, Lamelo Ball, Jacob Sartorious, Chase Hudson, Loren Gray, Maddie Ziegler, Asher Angel, Finn Wolfhard, Gaten Matarazzo, Skai Jackson, Jenna Ortega, Malu Travejo, NLE CHOPPA, Lil Tecca, etc.

Generation Z/Homelanders: 2003-2021 (parents to members of the post-Homeland Generation and onward; children to Generation X and Millennials)
Older Homelanders: 2003-2008 (the rise of the Homelanders, are probably 100% Gen Z because they have very strong Gen Z traits but possibly still have some lingering Millennial traits, especially those in the very beginning; came of age during or after the Covid-19 pandemic, born during the Bush administration and after the establishment of Homeland security, which is the main reason for them being Homelanders, the oldest in K-12, being in middle and high school during the new CDC laws this new school year, and will not be able to vote until there is a brand new president in office come 2024 at the earliest)
Famous people: Jojo Siwa, Cash Baker, Matty B, Johnny Orlando, Sophia Grace Brownlee, Aidan Gallagher, Lizzy Greene, Olivia Rodrigo, Charli D'Amelio, Annie LeBlanc, Mackenzie Ziegler, Millie Bobby Brown, Noah Schnapp, Lauren Orlando, Grace VanderWaal, Ellie Zeiler, Lebron James Jr., Sky Katz, Casey Simpson, Francesca Capaldi, Sofia Wylie, Addison Riecke, Mace Coronel, EvanTubeHD, Honey Boo Boo, Ella Anderson, Isaac Ryan Brown, Gianna Bryant, Rosie McClelland, Ruby Rube, Barron Trump, McKenna Grace, Ava Kolker, Adelia Rose, Mason Ramsey, Trinitee Stokes, Ariana Greenblatt, August Maturo, Elias Harger, Malachi Barton, Jason Maybaum, Hayley LeBlanc, Mia Talerico, JillianTubeHD, etc.
Middle Homelanders: 2009-2014 (100% Homelander, the zeitgeist of the generation, too early to possess any new generation traits; born during the Obama administration, being the youngest group in K-12 during the coronavirus pandemic outbreak last school year, so they are the last to truly, vividly remember life before it but grow up mainly after it and will probably all start high school long after this is all over, some of the last to actually remember life before the 2016 election)
Famous people: Gavin Thomas, Christiano Ronaldo Jr., Riley Curry, Blue Ivy Carter, North West, etc.
Younger Homelanders: 2015-2021 (the caboose of Homelanders who are in-between Z and the next generation, having strong traits of the next generation while still primarily being apart of Gen Z; don't remember life before President Trump, and barely know life before the coronavirus, especially since none of them were yet in kindergarten preceding it, largely born during the tail end of the Obama and Trump administration)
Famous people: TBD (Too young to analyze)
submitted by youngbull316 to generationology [link] [comments]


2020.08.12 08:03 autobuzzfeedbot 15 Movie And TV Age Gaps Between Actors That Are Really, Really Messed Up

  1. In The Phantom of the Opera, Emmy Rossum turned 17 a couple days before shooting began, while Gerard Butler was 33 and Patrick Wilson was 30.
  2. In Never Have I Ever, Maitreyi Ramakrishnan was 17 when she was cast as Devi. By the time the show premiered, she was 18 and love interest Darren Barnet was 29.
  3. In Singin' in the Rain, Debbie Reynolds was cast when she was 19 years old. Her onscreen love interest, Gene Kelly, was 40.
  4. In Magic in the Moonlight, there was a 28-year age gap between onscreen lovers Emma Stone and Colin Firth.
  5. In That '70s Show, Mila Kunis was only 14 when she was cast and 15 when the pilot aired. Ashton Kutcher was 20.
  6. In White Christmas, Bing Crosby was nearly twice the age of Rosemary Clooney. He was 51 when the movie came out, and she was 26.
  7. In Boy Meets World, Trina McGee (Angela) was 28 when she first appeared on the show. Her love interest, Rider Strong (Shawn), was 17.
  8. In Funny Face, Audrey Hepburn was 27 when the movie was released, and Fred Astaire was a few days shy of his 58th birthday.
  9. In Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, Keira Knightley was 17 when she shot the movie, and Orlando Bloom was 25.
  10. In Focus, there was a 22-year age gap between Will Smith and Margot Robbie when the movie was released.
  11. In The Greatest Showman, Zendaya just turned 20 when the movie started shooting, and Zac Efron was 29.
  12. In As Good As It Gets, Helen Hunt was 34 and Jack Nicholson was only a couple years older...plus or minus an extra 25 years.
  13. In Riverdale, KJ Apa and Ashleigh Murray's characters started dating when there was an 11-year age difference between the actors.
  14. In Entrapment, Sean Connery was more than double the age of love interest Catherine Zeta-Jones.
  15. And in Another Cinderella Story, Selena Gomez had just turned 16 when the movie was released, and Drew Seeley was 26.
Link to article
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2020.07.24 20:08 Tazzycatkt Icons

Here’s a list of beautiful, small breasted babes, feel free to add to it:
  1. Zendaya (Spider-Man Far From Home, Spider-Man Homecoming, The Greatest Showman, Euphoria).
  2. Keira Knightley (Bend it Like Beckham, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Aftermath).
  3. Julia Stiles (Save the Last Dance, Dexter, The Bourne Identity).
  4. Linda Fiorentino (The Last Seduction).
  5. Constance Wu (Crazy Rich Asians, Hustler, Fresh off the Boat).
  6. Audrey Hepburn (Iconic actress: Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Roman Holiday).
  7. Bailey Noble (True Blood).
  8. Emma Watson (Harry Potter, Perks of Being a Wallflower, Beauty and the Beast).
  9. Phoebe Waller-Bridge (Fleabag, Broadchurch).
  10. Sasha Grey (The Girlfriend Experience, and she was also a porn icon 😂).
  11. Rachel McAdams (Mean Girls, Dr. Strange, About Time, The Notebook).
  12. Kate Moss (Supermodel, Fashion Icon).
  13. Natalia Dyer (Stranger Things).
  14. Natalie Portman (Black Swan, V for Vendetta, Where the Heart is).
  15. Mila Kunis (That 70’s Show, Friends With Benefits, Black Swan).
  16. Twiggy (Iconic 60’s supermodel).
  17. Mia Farrow (Rosemary’s Baby).
  18. Maggie Q (Mission Impossible, La Femme Nikita, Designated Survivor).
  19. Cara Delevingne (Model, Valerian).
  20. Dakota Johnson (50 Shades of Grey).
I’ve read articles where it’s stated that many women are opting to remove their breast implants after problems with breast implant illness, some plastic surgeons have stopped performing breast augmentations altogether and are focusing on explanations (implant removals). I’ve also read that the trend is for smaller implants. It doesn’t seem worth doing at all after reading stories about breast implant illness. Also, these icons have been very successful with their small breasts.
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2020.07.13 23:44 sorryimveryhigh Mila Kunis has been a Hollywood MK ultra slave since she was 14

Mila Kunis famously lied about her age when she was hired for that 70s show, she was actually about 14 when the show started. When you consider some of the themes, and that a lot of her scenes were of her making out with a fully grown Ashton Kutcher you’ve gotta wonder how that’s even legal.
Why was a 14 year old immigrant allowed to mingle with fully grown Hollywood adults?
Look at her name Mila Kunis, MK = MK ultra? She dated Macaulay Culkin and we all know what he thinks about pedophile celebs. My guess is like most Hollywood couples their pairing wasn’t an accident, they probably bonded because of shared trauma
Now Mila is married to Ashton Kutcher, a man who she made out with on film from ages 14-20, if that’s not grooming idk what is. Meanwhile Kutcher has spoken about publicly against human trafficking and the exploitation of children(either feeling guilty, or being used to push the ideas that actors care)
Also just a bonus Ashton Kutcher was in a movie called Butterfly Effect
🦋 MK = Mila Kunis
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2020.06.23 17:03 autobuzzfeedbot 15 Actor Couples Who Enjoyed Each Other's Company So Much, They Worked Together

  1. In How I Met Your Mother, Robin's insufferable co-star Sandy Rivers is played by Alyson Hannigan's husband.
  2. Gob's wife in Arrested Development was played by Will Arnett's real-life wife, Amy Poehler.
  3. And Will returned the favour a few years later by guest-starring as Leslie Knope's ~awful~ blind date in Parks and Rec.
  4. But they weren't the only off-screen couple on the show – Tammy II was played by Nick Offerman's wife of 17 years, Megan Mullalley.
  5. Nick and Megan obviously have great chemistry both on and off-air, because he guest-starred on Will and Grace twice, as two different characters!
  6. In Brooklyn Nine-Nine, the puzzle master that Jake gets jealous of is Melissa Fumero's actual husband.
  7. And Joe Lo Truglio's wife had a tiny cameo in the episode where his character, Charles, is planning his wedding.
  8. In the episode where Pam gives birth in The Office, the lactation consultant who touches her boobs is her real-life husband.
  9. And Carol, the real estate agent who dated Michael, is Steve Carell's actual wife, Nancy.
  10. We all know how this partnership ended, but back when they were a happy couple, Brad was a guest star on Friends, where he played the co-founder of the "I Hate Rachel Green Club".
  11. And Brad wasn't the only hubby to make a cameo on the show – Courteney's other half David Arquette made an appearance as Ursula's stalker.
  12. Back to How I Met Your Mother, where Lily's clingy ex Scooter was played by Neil Patrick Harris's off-screen husband.
  13. HIMYM is clearly a show that supports couples, because Cobie Smulder's husband also made a cameo as Marshall's work colleague.
  14. We all know that Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher met on That '70s Show, but she also had a guest role on Two and a Half Men.
  15. And finally, Mrs Browns Boys – where the on-screen daughter of Mrs Brown is the off-screen wife of the actor who plays her!
Link to article
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2020.05.30 21:23 tonnie_taller That ‘70s Show Almost Had A Bigger Love Triangle Subplot

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The original plan for Eric Forman, Donna Pinciotti, and Steven Hyde was a lot different when That ’70s Show was still in early development, and it included an ongoing love triangle. The characters, played by Topher Grace, Laura Prepon, and Danny Masterson, respectively, made up half of the young group at the center of the Fox period sitcom. They were joined by Michael Kelso (Ashton Kutcher), Jackie Burkhart (Mila Kunis), and Fez (Wilmer Valderrama) as the teens facing the trials and tribulations of growing up in small-town America during the ’70s.
As the group grew older, their love lives became a key focus. It was established early that Kelso and Jackie were together and that Eric had a major crush on his next-door neighbor, Donna. Unfortunately for Eric, Hyde also had feelings for Donna, which came into focus during _That ’70s Show_season 1. Over the course of that first installment, Hyde put himself out there to catch Donna’s attention. Not only did he learn to dance just for her, but he also tried to make a move which was met with a slap. In the end, Donna ended up with Eric and the two embarked on an off-and-on relationship that lasted for the duration of the series — but the show almost went in another direction.
Related: That ‘70s Show: The Origin Of Red’s “Dumbass” Insult Explained
When _That ’70s Show_was still in the development phase, there were talks of having Eric and Hyde engage in an intense rivalry to fight for Donna’s affections. This would have kicked off a love triangle subplot lasting longer than the debut season. Instead, the writers decided to go in another direction for better character development. That didn’t stop the tease of the love triangle prospect, but considering the matchup between Eric and Donna in season 1, the notion was quickly pushed aside.
Though it was interesting to see Hyde wear his heart on his sleeve while interested in Donna, his home life became a more compelling focus of the series. Love triangles are often viewed as clichés and the same would have been said with two best friends vying for the same girl’s attention. Hyde made his move, but realized he and Donna were better off as friends. This opened the door for Eric and Donna’s complicated relationship to carry on as a subplot. It also allowed the series to focus on the issue that arose after Hyde’s parents abandoned him. Rather than pin Eric and Hyde against each other, the Forman family welcomed Hyde with open arms.
Despite not giving Hyde an opportunity to date Donna, That ’70s Show did reveal an alternate reality where the two ended up together. In the season 4 premiere, “It’s A Wonderful Life,” Eric envisioned how Hyde and Donna would have ended up together if his friend kissed her first. Hyde would have turned Donna into a rebel with piercings, tattoos, and clothes just like his. She would have also wound up raising their child alone since Eric believed Hyde could have ended up in jail. Of course, Eric was exaggerating when it came to that alternate reality but it was always made clear that Hyde and Donna were never a romantic match.
Next: That ‘70s Show Hilariously Predicted Laura Prepon’s Future On OITNB
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2020.05.27 22:00 yellowcrayonsss Just dropping by to leave y'all with this classic scene from "That 70's Show." Jessica Simpson, Mila Kunis, and Laura Prepon.

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2020.05.24 23:09 finnagains Unexpected Movie Masterpieces to Watch in Quarantine - by David Sims (The Atlantic) 10 April 2020

Some were blasted by critics, some flopped at the box office, and all are ripe to attain cult-classic status.
With new cinema releases grinding to a halt in response to the spread of the coronavirus, I’ve used these weeks of self-quarantine to cast an eye backward over the cinematic canon, to rewatch old favorites, and to fill in viewing gaps. Now I’ve begun evaluating films that, for whatever reason, didn’t get a fair shake when they were released. Some were blasted by critics, and others simply made no impression at the box office; all of them are available to watch online, just waiting to become cult classics. The 30 films I’ve chosen as the most underrated are all from the past 25 years, and many belong to genres (rom-com, sci-fi, thriller) that are overlooked in serious critical circles. Some of my selections might seem obvious and others ludicrous, but all were made in the spirit of enjoyable debate and discovery.
the Box-Office Flops
Kino Lorber Archipelago (2010, directed by Joanna Hogg)
Joanna Hogg broke out in American art houses last year with her wonderful autobiographical work The Souvenir, but she’s been making terrific indie films for years. Archipelago might be her best. A quiet drama, it sees Edward (played by Tom Hiddleston, a year before Thor catapulted him to fame) gathering with his family on the remote British island of Tresco after quitting his job to travel the world. Many long-simmering tensions boil to the surface; Hiddleston (who is in most of Hogg’s movies) gives one of his best screen performances, and Hogg depicts subtle, polite infighting with humor and insight. No filmmaker has a better handle on the ridiculous foibles of the English upper-middle class.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Babe: Pig in the City (1998, directed by George Miller)
George Miller is the master of sequels. Each of his installments in the Mad Max series is innovative; his Happy Feet Two is quietly underrated. But he’s never made a follow-up as strange and beguiling as Babe: Pig in the City. Miller wrote and produced the first Babe, a charming, Oscar-winning success. In the director’s chair for part two, though, he turned the sweet fable of a pig who wanted to herd sheep into a grim fairy tale about life in the big city. The movie was a commercial disaster, but it’s a rewarding, beautifully designed work set in a fantasy city that mashes up landmarks from every modern metropolis. The plot, such as it is, follows Babe as he goes on a trip and mixes it up with more streetwise animal brethren (the director Noah Baumbach once said that the film’s closest thematic companion is Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut).
Watch it on: Hulu, HBO Beyond the Lights (2014, directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood)
A gorgeous romantic drama about the pain and pleasure of pop stardom, Gina Prince-Bythewood’s remarkable Beyond the Lights made little impression at the box office on release, despite a star-making turn from Gugu Mbatha-Raw. The actor plays a Rihanna-esque figure named Noni Jean who falls for a police officer (Nate Parker) and tries to escape the limelight. Prince-Bythewood, who also wrote and directed the incredible Love & Basketball, is one of only a few people in Hollywood still trying to film genuine love stories, and she deserves many more chances to do so on the big screen.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Cadillac Records (2008, directed by Darnell Martin)
The smartest music biopic from a decade full of them (including 2004’s Ray and 2005’s Walk the Line, to name a couple), Darnell Martin’s portrayal of the rise and fall of Chess Records was woefully underseen in 2008. The film digs into the exploitative dynamics at work in so many early rock-and-roll labels, examining the troubled relationships between Leonard Chess (Adrien Brody) and his biggest stars: Muddy Waters (Jeffrey Wright), Etta James (Beyoncé Knowles), and Howlin’ Wolf (Eamonn Walker). The film has a harder edge than its contemporaries, and the musical performances are particularly sensational.
Watch it on: Crackle
Cloud Atlas (2012, directed by Lana Wachowski, Lilly Wachowski, and Tom Tykwer)
This is the most dizzyingly ambitious project in the Wachowski sisters’ expansive filmography. Adapting David Mitchell’s novel of the same name, Cloud Atlas encompasses six distinct stories, beginning with an 1849 naval adventure and zipping through the 1930s, the ’70s, and the present day before blasting to the clone-filled future of 2144 and ending in a postapocalyptic 2321. Members of the ensemble, including Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Hugh Grant, and Doona Bae, play different characters in each story line, and the film jumps backward and forward through time to reveal surprising thematic links. As with many a Wachowski project, you have to make a few logical leaps to get on board, but if you can, there’s no movie experience like it.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime
20th Century Fox Film Corp. Down With Love (2003, directed by Peyton Reed)
This knowing throwback to the “no-sex sex comedies” of the late ’50s and ’60s (like the Doris Day–starring Pillow Talk and Lover Come Back) was too clever for its own good on release. But it’s a fabulous, entertaining, and singular creation, both celebrating and subverting the innuendo-filled rom-coms of yesteryear. An impeccably styled Renée Zellweger and Ewan McGregor star as lifestyle writers who form a friendly rivalry in 1960s New York. Sarah Paulson and David Hyde Pierce round out the cast, and Peyton Reed (who had just directed Bring It On in 2000) plays off the visual language of his source material in stylish, innovative, and cheeky ways. When you watch, be sure to stick around for the fantastic musical number over the closing credits.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Dredd (2012, directed by Pete Travis)
Perhaps the best comic-book movie of the past decade was Dredd, a gritty adaptation of the Judge Dredd series that was a financial flop on release. Set in a dictatorial future in which armored policemen are empowered to dispense lethal justice for almost any crime, the film takes place entirely within a colossal tower block, following Dredd (Karl Urban) and a new trainee as they do battle with a sadistic mob boss (Lena Headey). It’s a gruesome but smart movie, at once lionizing and satirizing the ruthless efficiency of its hero. The film was written and produced by Alex Garland (Ex Machina, Annihilation), who has since become one of the most exciting sci-fi directors working today.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Killing Them Softly (2012, directed by Andrew Dominik)
Killing Them Softly is Andrew Dominik’s brutal follow-up to his painterly revisionist Western, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Also starring Brad Pitt, Killing Them Softly takes George V. Higgins’s hard-boiled ’70s crime novel Cogan’s Trade and updates it to the present day, following a mob robbery that goes wrong and the assassin (Pitt) hired to clean everything up. Dominik turns the web of competing criminal interests into a broad metaphor for the quagmire of the Iraq War. Killing Them Softly may have been too weird and slow for general audiences (it’s one of the few movies ever to earn an F on CinemaScore). But it’s bleakly funny and impressively acted by a cast that includes James Gandolfini, Ray Liotta, and Ben Mendelsohn.
Watch it on: Netflix Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005, directed by Shane Black)
The film that put Robert Downey Jr. back on the map was critically praised but ignored at the box office in 2005. An extremely metatextual crime comedy, it follows a thief (Downey Jr.) pretending to be an actor who gets mixed up in a murder and goes on the lam with his acting coach, a private investigator (Val Kilmer). The story line is as complicated as it sounds, but the thrill of Shane Black’s film lies in his hilariously punchy dialogue and his skill at making the most convoluted plotting flow with ease. The movie reintroduced Downey Jr. as a leading man after he’d spent years struggling with addiction: He was hired to play Iron Man mostly on the strength of this performance.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Premium Rush (2012, directed by David Koepp)
David Koepp’s bike-messenger thriller is far more robust than that description might suggest. Set on New York’s crowded streets, it follows Wilee (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), a deliveryman who picks up a package that’s tied to a criminal conspiracy; soon enough, he’s being chased around town by a crooked cop, Bobby Monday (Michael Shannon), who’s intent on taking him down. The story is told with unrelenting silliness, and Koepp translates Wilee’s brash confidence about weaving in and out of traffic into a visual roller-coaster ride. The highlight, though, is Shannon’s performance—he turns Monday into a living Looney Toon, gnashing his teeth and bulging out his eyes in fury with abandon.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Solaris (2002, directed by Steven Soderbergh)
Steven Soderbergh’s sci-fi opus was decried on release for daring to re-adapt a novel (by Stanisław Lem) that had already been turned into a film masterpiece (Andrei Tarkovsky’s sprawling 1972 work of the same name). But Soderbergh’s movie is a very different beast from Tarkovsky’s, stripping the story down to 99 minutes and focusing on the haunting romance at the center of the book. George Clooney plays Chris Kelvin, a psychologist haunted by the suicide of his wife, Rheya (Natascha McElhone). After hearing the mysterious distress signals sent out by a distant space station, he travels there—and finds Rheya, somehow re-created by the planet that the station is orbiting. The film includes stellar supporting performances by Viola Davis and Jeremy Davies, a beautifully understated score from Cliff Martinez, and some of the most compelling world-building in Soderbergh’s career.
Watch it on: Hulu
Sunshine (2007, directed by Danny Boyle)
This stunning space-mission drama from Danny Boyle and the screenwriter Alex Garland might be the Oscar-winning director’s best film. A wildly intense thriller about a last-gasp effort to restart the dying sun, Sunshine pits an outstanding cast (Cillian Murphy, Michelle Yeoh, Chris Evans, Rose Byrne, and more) against a monolithic enemy: the star at the center of our solar system, which Boyle depicts as an immovable, godlike force. As the voyagers’ ship gets closer to the sun, everything on board goes more and more haywire, and Boyle—who can depict the onset of madness better than almost anyone working—dials up the chaos.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Talk to Me (2007, directed By Kasi Lemmons)
Kasi Lemmons, whose most recent work is 2019’s Harriet, has long been one of Hollywood’s most criminally unheralded directors, and Talk to Me never got the wide audience it deserved in 2007. It’s a biopic of the controversial Washington, D.C., radio host Petey Greene (Don Cheadle) that’s unafraid to be messy, reflecting its subject’s surprising rise to fame as someone who fearlessly speaks his mind on the social and political issues of the 1970s. The film is grounded by excellent performances from Cheadle, Taraji P. Henson, and Chiwetel Ejiofor, who plays Greene’s put-upon manager, Dewey Hughes.
Watch it on: Hulu, Sling What If (2013, directed by Michael Dowse)
Also known as The F Word (its title was changed in America for obvious reasons), this extremely charming slow-burn rom-com was unfairly overlooked on release. It follows two people (Daniel Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan) who become friends but spend the entire time wondering if they’d be better off as lovers. Many relationship hijinks ensue, but the movie works because of the performances at its center, along with energetic supporting turns from Adam Driver and Mackenzie Davis, who were both on their way to bigger, franchise fame.
Watch it on: Prime The Yards (2000, directed by James Gray)
Back in 2000, James Gray’s operatic crime thriller was dumped unceremoniously into theaters by Harvey Weinstein and ignored by audiences. Like all the director’s films, though, it’s well worth viewing, combining hard-boiled storytelling with graceful visuals. Mark Wahlberg gives one of his best performances as Leo, an ex-con who returns to the fold of his shady New York family and gets tangled up in city corruption surrounding the subway system. A shifty Joaquin Phoenix plays Leo’s ne’er-do-well friend who is embroiled in a dramatic relationship with a young woman (Charlize Theron), while James Caan is suitably menacing as Leo’s morally dubious benefactor. The Yards also showed the first signs of Gray’s considerable talent; he’d go on to make We Own the Night, Two Lovers, The Lost City of Z, and Ad Astra.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime the critical bombs
Warner Bros. Addicted to Love (1997, directed by Griffin DUnne)
All of Griffin Dunne’s films (including the delightfully bizarre Practical Magic) deserve more appreciation, but Addicted to Love is a personal favorite of mine, a largely forgotten romantic comedy that satirizes gooey Hollywood storytelling tropes. It casts Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick, two stalwarts of the rom-com genre, as a bitter pair united by a hatred of their respective exes, who are now dating each other. Ryan and Broderick spy on their former partners and, of course, eventually fall for each other, but the film never sacrifices its acidic tone, even as their relationship turns tender.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Armageddon (1998, directed by Michael Bay)
If nothing else, Armageddon is a crucial cultural artifact: a portent of American culture’s jingoism in the 2000s, when blockbuster action sequences had the tone and tenor of Budweiser commercials. Where Michael Bay’s prior film, The Rock (which is much better regarded), had tapped into the U.S. military’s dysfunction and despondency post-Vietnam, Armageddon sees the country uniting to obliterate an evil asteroid by turning to … the oil industry. (It also spends a good chunk of time mocking post-Soviet Russia.) Despite the ridiculous plotting and Bay’s frenetic editing of every set piece, Armageddon is the clearest distillation of his macho brand of propaganda, designed to have audiences cheering by the end (against their better judgment). Listen to Ben Affleck’s gleeful commentary to triple the entertainment factor.
Watch it on: Hulu, HBO Blackhat (2015, directed by Michael Mann)
Five years ago, one of the great contemporary directors still working made a globe-trotting cyber thriller starring Thor himself and was completely ignored. Booed by critics and dumped by its studio into the doldrums of January, Blackhat made only a shocking $8 million at the domestic box office. Yet it’s a terrific entry in Michael Mann’s esteemed body of work (which includes other movies, such as Heat, Miami Vice, and Manhunter, that were underrated in their day). Chris Hemsworth plays a hard-bodied hacker who’s released from prison to battle a shadowy online terrorist; like many of Mann’s later films, Blackhat is a story of the analog world’s struggle to confront its digital future, wrapped up in a very masculine action saga. If you can, try to catch the director’s cut, which cleans up some of the film’s dense plotting and airs regularly on FX.
Watch it on: FX The Box (2009, directed by Richard Kelly)
This is the third film directed by Richard Kelly, a onetime wunderkind who burst onto the scene with the 2001 cult hit Donnie Darko. The Box is also his best, though few have recognized it as such. It was a bomb on release, getting poor reviews and the rare dishonor of an F from CinemaScore. But its wild ambition is second to none, spinning Richard Matheson’s mordant short story “Button, Button” into a paranoid 1970s epic—part domestic drama, part psychological horror, part sci-fi fantasy revolving around a NASA expedition to Mars and magic portals. This movie has short, simple scares that I’ve never forgotten, and a plot convoluted enough to obsess over forever. I live in hope of a fourth film from Kelly.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Constantine (2005, directed by Francis Lawrence)
Fifteen years after its release, this remains one of the best and cleverest comic-book adaptations ever made, and probably the most underrated entry in Keanu Reeves’s cinematic career. This is a horror thriller that dives into biblical fantasy, casting a varied ensemble (Tilda Swinton, Djimon Hounsou, Gavin Rossdale, and Shia LaBeouf) as various angels and demons doing battle in modern-day Los Angeles. Based on Alan Moore’s Vertigo comic Hellblazer, Constantine junks a lot of the established hallmarks of the character John Constantine (he’s supposed to be a witty Brit who looks like Sting), but that doesn’t matter. Reeves’s laconic style is a perfect fit for the cynical antihero, and Rachel Weisz thrives in twin roles as sisters on either side of an infernal crime that Constantine is called to investigate.
Watch it on: DC Universe The Counselor (2013, directed by Ridley Scott)
Of the seven films made by Ridley Scott in the past decade, none is more critically reviled than The Counselor, a knotty crime drama written by Cormac McCarthy and featuring an all-star ensemble that includes Brad Pitt, Javier Bardem, Michael Fassbender, Penélope Cruz, and Cameron Diaz. Summarizing its noir-ish plot, which revolves around the Juárez, Mexico, drug trade, is impossible, but the film is worth watching simply because there’s nothing like it. McCarthy’s florid dialogue and Scott’s hazy visuals are bewitching, and every actor gives an energetic performance pushed to ridiculous heights (one scene in particular, involving Diaz and a Ferrari, is hypnotically baffling). The Counselor is a dark acquired taste, but a deeply satisfying one.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Universal pictures The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006, directed by Justin Lin)
After the success of the first Fast and the Furious movie, in 2001, Vin Diesel’s car-racing franchise struggled to stand out until 2009, when its original cast returned under Justin Lin’s direction for the surprise smash Fast & Furious. But the groundwork for that revitalization had been laid three years earlier with Tokyo Drift, Lin’s debut film in the series. Though Tokyo Drift introduces Sung Kang as the fan-favorite character Han, none of the series’s other beloved characters appears. Yet Lin’s skill with crisp action and quick-paced banter—built up in his fantastic breakthrough, Better Luck Tomorrow, which also starred Kang—makes this one of the best in the franchise.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Hulk (2003, directed by Ang Lee)
Coming off the resounding success of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Ang Lee could’ve made any film he wanted. He picked an adaptation of Marvel Comics’ most tortured star, the Hulk (Eric Bana). At the time, the movie was seen as odd, mocked for its wobbly CGI, and suffered one of the largest box-office drops in history for a blockbuster after its opening weekend. Viewed now, given the cookie-cutter format of contemporary superhero movies, it’s a startling experience. Lee turns his film into a living comic book, zooming in and out of boxy frames and inventing a visual language that could’ve become an exciting norm for the medium. The story, which sees the Hulk doing Freudian battle with his demonic father (Nick Nolte) and unearthing dark family secrets, is bizarre, and thrillingly so.
Watch it on: Starz In the Cut (2003, directed by Jane Campion)
Every film Jane Campion has directed since her Oscar-winning The Piano (1993) is underrated and underseen, but In the Cut was perhaps her biggest flop on release. That was partly because it subverted Meg Ryan’s usual bubbly onscreen persona, casting her as Frannie Avery, an introverted English teacher who starts dating the detective (Mark Ruffalo) investigating a murder case in her apartment building. It’s a sweaty, grisly, and sexually charged thriller that swerves from strange comedy to gory horror from scene to scene. But that tonal whiplash is one of Campion’s smartest storytelling tools, properly rattling viewers and plunging them into Frannie’s mixed-up headspace.
Watch it on: Crackle Jennifer’s Body (2009, directed by Karyn Kusama)
This is the movie that landed Karyn Kusama in “movie jail” for almost a decade: a gleefully bloody teen-horror comedy that was undone by the high expectations for its script. The writer, Diablo Cody, had won an Oscar the previous year for her Juno screenplay, and though this follow-up had that film’s humor, its intense gore and flippant humor were too much for critics at the time. Fortunately, Jennifer’s Body is already being reevaluated as a trashy classic, a nastier update of movies like Heathers that turns the social competition of high school into a literal bloodbath. Kusama has also reemerged as a filmmaker, with the excellent indie horror The Invitation.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Universal pictures Josie and the Pussycats (2001, directed by Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan)
This knowing revival of the Archie Comics series was a failure on release, but has deservedly attracted a cult following in the years since. It’s a pitch-perfect parody of the manufactured pop pipeline in the early 2000s, watching as the chipper rock band comprising Josie (Rachael Leigh Cook), Melody (Tara Reid), and Valerie (Rosario Dawson) is run through the major-label mill. Parker Posey and Alan Cumming play perfect corporate villains, and almost every scene is suffused with ostentatious subliminal advertising, with au courant brand names crowding the frame. It’s a bitingly clever work, with a great power-pop soundtrack that includes contributions from the late Adam Schlesinger.
Watch it on: Hulu with Cinemax, Xfinity Jupiter Ascending (2015, directed by Lana Wachowski and Lilly Wachowski)
In the 2010s, blockbuster studio filmmaking made a hard pivot to existing intellectual property for its biggest movies: Star Wars, comic books, anything audiences might have nostalgia for. The Wachowskis, as they often do, went their own route. After giving cinema one of its greatest franchises in 1999 with The Matrix, the duo took a different direction in 2015 with a loopily operatic sci-fi epic rooted in nothing but their own imaginations. They were pilloried by critics. Jupiter Ascending is a wonderfully absurd space fairy tale starring Channing Tatum as a dog-man, Eddie Redmayne as an immortal arch-capitalist villain, and Mila Kunis as a secret princess who unwittingly owns the property deeds to our solar system. If you can get on this movie’s wavelength, you’ll find much to enjoy in its many flights of fancy.
Watch it on: Netflix
Non-Stop (2014, directed by Jaume Collet-Serra)
Since the surprise success of Taken in 2008, Liam Neeson has played a broken-down man forced to take the law into his own hands in countless mid-budget action dramas: Unknown, Cold Pursuit, The Commuter, Run All Night, and many more. Non-Stop is easily the best of them, partly thanks to Jaume Collet-Serra, a Spanish director who is one of the finest purveyors of modern pulp cinema (along with many Neeson movies, his other credits include The Shallows and Orphan). Set entirely on an airplane flying from New York to London, Non-Stop follows an alcoholic air marshal who gets caught in a deadly battle when a terrorist starts texting him. Perfectly befitting its setting, this thriller has the plot of the best kind of airplane paperback, with just the right number of twists and turns.
Watch it on: Sling Ocean’s Twelve (2004, directed by Steven Soderbergh)
Despite coasting to box-office success, Ocean’s Twelve was disliked on release for swerving in the opposite direction from the über-cool Ocean’s Eleven. Critics dismissed it as overindulgent, pretentious, and ultimately pointless: The heist plot is nigh-impossible to understand, most of the crucial exposition is entirely absent, and there’s a subplot in which the character played by Julia Roberts pretends to be the real Julia Roberts. In hindsight, though, the film is a perfect deconstruction of sequel logic, showing the difficulty of finding new directions for a beloved cast of characters. Where Ocean’s Eleven was all smooth style, Ocean’s Twelve is a knowing subversion that lays bare the ridiculous fallacy of movie-star charm. It also happens to be very, very funny.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime Pain & Gain (2013, directed by Michael Bay)
Practically every Bay film has been dismissed by reviewers on release, and often for good reason. His high-octane storytelling style makes the simplest scenes of dialogue utterly hyperactive, and most of his recent efforts are about talking robot toys. But Pain & Gain was a sly departure for this director, a low-budget (by his standards) crime comedy that feels like a Coen Brothers movie on growth hormones. Based on a true story, Pain & Gain is about three bodybuilders (played by Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson, and Anthony Mackie) who embark on a harebrained kidnapping scheme for easy money; naturally, things quickly go awry. Bay doesn’t abandon his trademark energy, but instead deploys it as satire—these characters might think they’re in a flashy action movie, but their circumstances are far more mundane and depressing.
Watch it on: Vudu, Prime
https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2020/04/30-underrated-films-watch-quarantine/609784/
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2020.05.01 16:01 tc182 TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show.

TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show. submitted by tc182 to Dude_WheresMyCar [link] [comments]


2020.04.13 02:06 Kisaaa Easter eggs: Show/Movie references

It’s an unpopular opinion but I enjoyed the show a lot more after Charlie sheen left and Ashton Kutcher came in (also prob doesn’t help he’s my main mans).
However, what really got me in the last few seasons was the random references to other shows or movies the characters were in etc
As an example, Mila Kunis referencing that 70s show of Ashton Kutcher referencing dude where’s my car but my ultimate fav:
When Walden (ashton) comes down the stairs after a wild party and says “this looks like Charlie sheen’s house” 😂
Feel free to post your fav references or one liners 👏🏼
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2020.04.03 20:12 Ex__ Quarantainment Suggestion: Movies that take place in Los Angeles

EDIT: If something is missing, check the edits first.
Hello all! I don't know about the rest of this town, but I sure do enjoy movies. In this post I'm going to share a list of movies that:
A.) Are watchable, possibly even entertaining.
B.) Take place in Los Angeles. Some may simply have just a scene or two in Los Angeles whereas others are fully written for a Los Angeles setting. Some may even be fictional locations that were neverless filmed in and highly resemble the Los Angeles area.
Most of these are mainstream movies so no real gems in this list, but I encourage others to contribute in the comments. I realize that not everyone has watched everything, so I'll provide insight that assumes you haven't seen the film yet.

Movies that take place in a non-fictional Los Angeles setting

Movies that partially take place in Los Angeles

Movies that take place in a fictionalized Los Angeles

Thats it for my list. Don't feel like proofreading it, so I apologize for any grammatical errors. Be aware that I can't think of or remember EVERYTHING. Also this isn't meant to be an encyclopedic list, so there are some films I left off intentionalyl ebcause I didn't feel they were what I considered watchable. That being said, I'll edit in any film that's commented below, but don't blame me if you watch it and it sucks ass.
EDIT:
Swimming With Sharks (1994) - Another one I forgot. Stars 90s Kevin Spacey and Brett from Pulp Fiction. Decent watch, if not a bit over the top with the ending.
Up in Smoke (1978) - The original stoner comedy. Stars the comedy duo Cheech and Chong. Excellent watch and they do a good performance of Earache My Eye. In fact, the entire soundtrack is dope. Definitely worth a watch.
Car Wash (1976) - Solid comedy, stars Richard Pryor, and spawned the song of the same titled that charted heavily in the 70s. Had a really stupid remake that I think Aftermath records produced named The Wash that is not at all worth mentioning further.
Set It Off (1996) - A bank heist film on the surface, but really the black woman's answer to Thelma and Louise. Stars Jada Pinkett-Smith, Vivica A. Fox, and Queen Latifah as a lesbian waaaaaaay before she officially came out.
u/Cribbit has further decreed that Bosch (Amazon Prime) and Barry (HBO) are further required watching for continued Los Angeles residency.
u/SoCaLABoy - L.A. Story (1991
u/south_butt - Chinatown (1974) - can't believe I forgot about this one
u/LaCienegaBoulevard - Drive (2011)
u/LaCienegaBoulevard - Encino Man (1992)
u/yungmisdreavus - The Falcon and the Snowman (1985)
u/illaparatzo - The Little Shop of Horrors (1960)
u/Omaro1 - 500 Days of Summer (2009)
u/Westcork1916 - Falling Down (1993)
u/Westcork1916 - Fight Club (1999)
u/Westcork1916 - Swordfish (2001)
u/Westcork1916 - The Fast and the Furious (2001)
u/the_boy_who_lied - Speed (1994)
u/ItsAaronYo - Lethal Weapon 1-4 (1987-1998)
u/can_non - The Big Lebowski (1998)
u/CPL593 - Short Cuts (1993)
u/CPL593 - Repo Man (1984)
u/CPL593 - To Live and Die in L.A. (1985)
u/CPL593 - Suburbia (1983)
u/CPL593 - The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976)
u/CPL593 - The Player (1992)
u/CPL593 - The Loved One (1965)
u/CPL593 - Body Double (1984)
u/CPL593 - Ed Wood (1994)
u/CPL593 - The Long Goodbye (1973)
u/CPL593 - Busting (1974)
u/CPL593 - Minnie and Moskowitz (1971)
u/CPL593 - Massacre Mafia Style (1974)
u/CPL593 - The Decline of Western Civilization (1981)
u/ZanderSchwab - Go (1999)
u/torpedobonzer - Blood In Blood Out (1993)
u/torpedobonzer - American Me (1992)
u/torpedobonzer - Real Women Have Curves (2002)
u/torpedobonzer - Born In East L.A. (1987)
u/torpedobonzer - My Family (1995)
u/mkgarcia - Magnolia (1999)
u/thatmattg - Under the Silver Lake (2019)
u/dookoo - Volcano (1997)
u/fujiiiiiiiiii - La La Land (2016)
u/aaf14 - Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
u/evilr2 - Escape from LA (1996)
u/evilr2 - Tango & Cash (1989)
u/evilr2 - They Live (1988)
u/evilr2 - Last Action Hero (1993)
u/evilr2 - This is the End (2013)
u/Articulate_Silence - Collateral (2004)
u/Mattisthe1 - Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005)
u/eaglebtc - Stand and Deliver (1988)

submitted by Ex__ to LosAngeles [link] [comments]


2020.03.30 02:13 RightLifeguard1 Mila Kunis (that 70's Show)

Mila Kunis (that 70's Show) submitted by RightLifeguard1 to CelebGfys [link] [comments]


2020.03.19 11:22 thaiwifefinder Mila Kunis Biography

Film and TV on-screen character Mila Kunis came to distinction on the sitcom 'That '70s Show.' In film, she's co-featured in such hits as 'Overlooking Sarah Marshall, 'Dark Swan' and 'Awful Moms.'

Who Is Mila Kunis?

Entertainer Mila Kunis was conceived in Chernivtsi, Ukraine, in 1983. At seven years old, she moved with her family to Los Angeles, where she started taking acting exercises. In the wake of showing up in a few TV ads, Kunis handled a co-featuring job in the Fox sitcom That '70s Show in 1998, which prompted voice work for the animation arrangement Family Guy. Kunis has since delighted in a fruitful big screen vocation, gaining notice for jobs in Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008), Black Swan (2010), Friends with Benefits (2011), Ted (2012) and Bad Moms (2016), among different highlights.

Individual Life

Kunis dated Culkin for a long time, before their "genial" split was declared in mid 2011. A long time later, while showing up on Dax Shepard's webcast, she admitted that their separation was unquestionably more troublesome than initially depicted, saying, "I f****d up."

In 2012 Kunis started dating entertainer Ashton Kutcher, her long-term co-star and on-screen beau from That '70s Show. In March 2014, news sources started detailing that Kunis, 30, and Kutcher, 36, were locked in and Kunis affirmed they were expecting a child in an appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show in May. The couple invited their child little girl, Wyatt Isabelle Kutcher, on September 30, 2014. In 2015 Kunis and Kutcher were hitched over the Fourth of July weekend at the Secret Garden at Parrish Ranch in Oak Glen, California, as indicated by People magazine. On November 30, 2016, Kunis brought forth their subsequent kid, a child named Dimitri Portwood Kutcher.

Regardless of every last bit of her prosperity, Kunis, who didn't have the foggiest idea about an expression of English when she previously showed up in the United States, says she hasn't overlooked her foundations. She lives in Los Angeles, not a long way from her folks, and when she visits, regularly communicates in Russian with them.

"We resulted in these present circumstances nation with actually nothing, thus any degree of accomplishment is imperative to us," Kunis has said. "[My parents] never needed me to turn into an entertainer since it's such a temperamental and flighty calling. At the point when you're migrants, and you need to buckle down for everything just to endure, it's just characteristic that you stress over having a steady activity and salary. In any case, I think currently they're pretty much persuaded that I'm doing entirely well and they don't need to stress over my vocation prospects any more."
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2020.03.18 04:51 Kpopkinz Never knew what celebrity i looked like, only comment I’ve got related to that is when some girls said i looked like mila kunis in that 70’s show while in a 70’s outfit lol

Never knew what celebrity i looked like, only comment I’ve got related to that is when some girls said i looked like mila kunis in that 70’s show while in a 70’s outfit lol submitted by Kpopkinz to celebritylookalike [link] [comments]


2020.03.09 23:10 tc182 Mila Kunis - That '70s Show (2002-2004)

Mila Kunis - That '70s Show (2002-2004) submitted by tc182 to Dude_WheresMyCar [link] [comments]


2020.02.29 17:46 Know_Your_Shit_v2 [todayilearned] TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show.

[todayilearned] TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show. submitted by Know_Your_Shit_v2 to knowyourshit [link] [comments]


2020.02.29 17:01 unremovable TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show.

TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show. submitted by unremovable to unremovable [link] [comments]


2020.02.29 14:23 DvD_cD TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show.

TIL in 1998 Mila Kunis was cast in the FOX sitcom That '70s Show. All who auditioned were required to be at least 18 years old; Kunis, who was 14 at the time, told the casting directors she would be 18 but did not say when. She played in all 200 episodes of the show. submitted by DvD_cD to todayilearned [link] [comments]


The Evolution of Mila Kunis, From ‘That ’70s Show’ to ‘The ...